In 1895, in the rooms of Műcsarnok Palace (Budapest) held an exhibition of foreign artists. A large amount of turn of the century illustrations, paintings, book decorations were exhibited. The artists came from Germany, England, Holland and Austria: in Budapest were eventually presented works by Franz von Stuck, Jan Toorop, Ferdinand Hodler, Axeli Gallen-Kallelá, Aubry Beardsley, Gustav Klimt and Walter Crane. The exhibition succedeed and, as a consequence , four years later, a monographic event presenting works by the english painter and illustrator Walter Crane was organized.  From Hungarian Quarterly:

1900 Walter Crane, by now arguably the best-known decorative artist in Britain since the death of William Morris in l896, held a one-man exhibition of his work at the Museum of Applied Arts, and was taken on a tour of Transylvania, where he made drawings of peasant ornament. Academics, museum directors, journalists and the Minister of Culture, Gyula Wlassics, danced attendance on him.[...]
The appetite of some progressive Hungarian architects and designers for things British seems to have been markedly intellectual, a matter of political ideals and radicalism. This sort of thing goes back to 1848. Thus the inspiring and confusing writings of John Ruskin counted for much, especially among the artists at Gödölloý. ‘We are all his disciples,’ Körösfoýi-Kriesch wrote, ‘whether we read a single line by him or not. He is the source of this entire modern artistic movement… William Morris, who stood at the head of the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain because of his social status as a poet, his interest in craftsmanship, and his success in designing and selling decorative art, was actually better known in Hungary as a Socialist and as the author of News from Nowhere. Walter Crane was not a thinker of the order of Ruskin and Morris-intellectually, his writings are bland. But he had the right credentials: he had learned his radicalism as a young man from his master in wood engraving, W. J. Linton, who was an active supporter of Kossuth. And when he visited Transylvania, his words and drawings gave confirmation to the Hungarian fascination with folk art.” – Hungarian Quarterly, VOLUME XLII * No. 163 * Autumn 2001

The influences of the english Art Nouveau movements upon the hungarian art at the turn of the century had a turning point in the Walter Crane exhibition held in Budapest in 1900. I was able to find out a reproduction of the poster eventually illustrated by Walter Crane himslef in that occasion, amongst other drawings performed by the artist for the hungarian literature magazine “Uj Idok”.

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The original poster of the 1900 Walter Crane’s exhibition

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