array(1) { ["display_type"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(20) "Invalid display type" } }

Taking a walk around the roads (útca) in Pest (eastern) side of Budapest can really be a very interesting experience even by art’s history point of view. In fact, who is fascinated by art, specially if related to the turn of the century architecture and sculpture, would be difficult not to regard at the large amount of interesting residential houses, former commercial buildings (arhuaz), often now converted into apartments and lofts, as well as former spa and government buildings.

100_1167_cover.JPG

These buildings are mainly styled with artistic modalities known with different names throughout Europe and America: jugendstil in Germany, art nouveau in Belgium, France and United Kingdom and United States, Liberty in northern Italy, Secession in Austria and finally, here, in Hungary with the term of Szecesszió.


Also details, such as frieze decorations, columns ornamented by human, mainly female, characters, architraves full of smiling female heads or laughing satyrs or even more crying Daphne and evil smiling devils, which abound on building’s facades, constitute remarkable elements of the secessionist style. More important, all these architectonic complementary elements, characterize not only the most famous building (palota in hungarian) (just to mention the most famous one, the Gresham’s, the Turk Bank, the Geological Institute Palace or the Central Postal both designed by the best known Hungarian fin-de-siecle architect, Odon Lechner). Also everyday residential buildings are richly decorated in secessionist style. This constitutes a sort of hidden treasure of Budapest, which is not fully discovered until now.
Having the goal the building preservation, during the last years, a considerable effort was made by the Budapest municipality. A fairly good number of turn of the century buildings have been renewed by the very effort of the so called Municipal Heritage Fund, and consequently a commemorative volume was printed in 2004. One of the most particular secessionist era buildings renewed by direct intervention of the municipal heritage fund, was the orthodox synagogue in Dob útca, in the VIIth district (Pest side), built after the project by Hungarian architects, the brothers Sandor and Bela Löffler. In that case, the most effective efforts were directed to recover the original aspect of the facade that “was badly polluted and the gratings of the gas convectors destroyed the overall impression. Renovation began in 2000 [...]“. The recovering interventions included “cleaning the facade, ,replacing the damaged elements, covering all the plastered surfaces with water-resistant coating, and the repair and surface treatment of the wrought-iron ornamental gratings. Finally the last interventions ended the global renewal program by “the reconstruction f the five meter wrought-iron masts decorating the pilasters and containing motifs of Menorah on the facade, and on the replacement of the ground floor portals, the gate and the stairs”. {Budapest Preserves its Beauty, p. 19}
Eventually other interventions have to be done, in particular in some district of Budapest, in which fairly damaged, as well as interesting by artistic point of view, buildings are situated. It is the case of Nepszinhaz street (Nepszinhaz útca).
In this article, I will examine only two of the outstanding buildings that one can encounter in Nepszinhaz útca, the contructions respectively at the number 22 and 39. Some of the other secessionist buildings on that street are the following:
Népszinház u. 35 (by Béla Malnai – Gyula Haász, apartments building, 1912)
Népszinház u. 32 (by Emil Bauer – Gyula Guttmann, apartments building, 1911
Népszinház u. 31 (by Sámuel Révész – Jószef Kollár, apartments building, 1912)
Népszinház u. 19 (by Béla Lajta, apartments building, 1910-12)
Népszinház u. 17 (by Sámuel Révész – Jószef Kollár, apartments building)

Invalid Displayed Gallery

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Polls

Ferdnand Khnopff vs Otto Eckmann

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013

Basel 2013