Archive for March, 2008

By the turn of the century, there were many brilliant architects already at work, among them Béla Lajta, the representative of pre-modern architecture; Istvan Medgyaszay, a formal and structural innovator as well writer, editor and graphic artist; Károly Kós, who sought the roots of national artchitecture in medieval Transylvanian buildings; and, above all, Ödön Lechner, the pioneer of the “Hungarian Style”, and a figure of major importance in the development of modern Hungarian architecture.

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The Nyugat magazine was one of the most influencing cultural, artistic and literary journal of the fin-de-siecle Hungary. Founded in 1908, Nyugat birth was consequence of the convergence of other previous three literary magazines, Magyar Géniusz, Virágfakadás and Figyelö. Illuminated by an engraving by the Hungarian artist Beck Ö Fülöp, the first number of Fygielö, eventually published in 1905, opened with an article by Osvát Ernö. In this article he described the cultural environment of Hungary as populated by an artistic production that was completely tradiotionalist, without any true revolutionary forces in a word, ruled by a renunciation attitude. In order the talented artist, let alone if writer, painters or poets, could express their peculiarities, the Fygielö magazine was conceived as a sort of a club, in which every member could freely reveal their own artistic ability.
After the experience of the Fifyelö magazine, the whole group of artists began to publish their intervention on Nyugat.

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Following is a translation of a commemorative speech by the hungarian painter János Vaszary as appeared in Pesti Naplo, 4 February 1928.

Joszef Rippl-Ronai was born in the country side of Hungary, where the words of people sound like ancient musical instruments, where the pagans, for a long time, continued to sacrifice on their Hun altars. The ancient Land of Hungary, which was the highest background of his genius, was also a perpetual recall to the land of his fathers. Paris and Europe, for Rippl-Ronai as was for Endre Ady, were just a forest in which was easier the discover of his hungarian essence.

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The following is an article, written by the famous Hungarian art critic Karoly Lyka, published on the art magazine Művészet, which was eventually founded in 1902 by Lyka himself. This article represents a sort of Hungarian Secession style manifesto, and appeared in volume I of the magazine, in the year 1902. For that reason, it was one of the most influencing text in the development of the Hungarian Secession national style. The translation of this text represents a tribute to the Hungarian nation for the national celebration for the 15 march, 160 years after the 1848 independence war against Augsburg empire.
“We can affirm that in Hungary happened an event identical to what happened in other countries: the roots of both Secession and Hungarian Style (to use a common expression)is the same. Even similar, if not identical, is the fate behind their own short history. Consequently the Secession, in its origin, essence and effects, is identical to what is called Hungarian Secession.

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Both the buildings are designed by the hungarian architect Körössy Albert Kálmán.

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Ferenc Helbing was professor of graphics at the Applied Art High School of Budapest and was famous because he worked for the Polygraph where he designed several pengo and krone banknotes.

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The building at the civic number 22 was projected by the Hungarian architect Emil Vidor (1867-1951).

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A wonderful frieze just up on the entrance of the Lybian embassy in Stefánia út 111.

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All those fascinating red hair girlies are really so luscious and very very erotic …

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Maroti was one of the most influencing architect, sculpture and designer of the hungarian szecessziò. At the beginning of his career he worked on several buildings projects, both in Vienna and Budapest.

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