Archive for the ‘Austrian Secession History’ Category

Unknown – AND – Tryptich

Athena (1913)

Auer Robert AUER (1873–1952) Tryptich

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Untitled (Barbara with eyes closed), c.1925-30

Untitled (Gunda, nude), 1922

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Margaret Loke, The New York Times, 22 Febryary 2002:

The Austrian artist Artur Nikodem created personal work radically different from his public art. Publicly, Nikodem, who was born in 1870, produced color-drenched paintings that reflected the influence of Monet and Cézanne. Privately, he took strikingly modernist, spare photographs, possibly beginning during World War I when he became a telegraph officer and for a time was stationed in Turkey.
Nikodem the photographer kept that part of his creativity to himself, and it remained a secret for years after he died in 1940. His great-grandson, Martin Krulis, came across a cache of his photographs, most of them contacts printed from glass-plate negatives, and brought them to Robert Mann.
In the exhibition catalog, Monika Faber, a photography curator in Vienna, noted that Nikodem tested cameras and film for a friend, a photographic supplies dealer. His prints here are small, many 2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches, with a few about 3 by 5 inches. Hung in a dim gallery, each image spotlighted, the 34 pictures raise the expectation that they are all of superb quality.
Many are exquisite, especially those of Barbara, a model who became his wife. Clothed or unclothed, she exudes a smoky sensuality all the more potent because Nikodem doesn’t distract with stylized poses or superfluous props. As if taking cues from Stieglitz vis-à-vis the majestic O’Keeffe, Nikodem made love to Barbara with his camera, taking marvelously casual pictures of her feet, her hands, her naked back, as she ate fruit or sat in a chair. But Nikodem’s sea and landscape shots of Turkey and rural Austria are nothing to write home about. The show would be stronger without them. Peering at Nikodem’s small prints, particularly his inspired portraits of people familiar to him, even his austere self-portrait, you might also wish the gallery had larger prints made. They wouldn’t be vintage, but they could be extraordinary.

Untitled (Barbara, feet and teddy), c.1925-30

Untitled (sitting nude), c.1920s

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Kubin’s "The Other Side"
The Novel written in metaphorical and symbolic language is a sort of autobiographic novel. The narrator, Kubin himself decides, along with his wife to move to “Pearl”, the capital of a built in Central Asia, dream realm, pull, whose daily life of Ancient (old buildings, mills, homes, disreputable bars, towers, cafes), a Kafkaesque bureaucratic hierarchy and emotional discord (hysteria, anxiety, disorientation, chaos and obsessions) is controlled, and in which there is neither technical nor cultural progress. The inhabitants of the city, shrouded by dense fog, are sensitive dreamer, subject only to the logic of the dream world. Patera, the ruler of the dream realm is left to decay, so the chaos is increasing.

Kubin’s novel exerted a decisive influence on writers like Franz Kafka, Gustav Meyrink and Ernst Jünger.
It is probably also in the sense Kubin, if we interpret the novel as so many of his prints as a symbol of the fatalistic view of things, but even he calls himself a fatalist.
In the novel "The Other Side" and also in the drawings noted Ernst Jünger a peculiarity of the composition, which he calls "unrelated simultaneity," a blunt isolation of the individuals who are in the world such as in a number of prison cells next to each other act similarity to Georg Trakl.

Alfred Kubin - die Andere SeiteAlfred Kubin - die Andere SeiteAlfred Kubin - die Andere SeiteAlfred Kubin - die Andere SeiteAlfred Kubin - die Andere Seite

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Life

Josef Plečnik, born 23 1. 1871 Ljubljana (Ljubljana, Slovenia), † 6 1. Ibid 1957, was architect and designer. Studied in L. Theyer in Graz and 1894-98 in O. Wagner at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, participating in Wagner’s office in the planning of the Vienna city railway; 1900-11 were his most important works in Vienna, for which he also designed the interior (Zacherl House in Vienna 1, 1903-05) ; 1911-20 teaching at the vocational school in Prague and fixtures at the Prague Castle. His most important sacred works are in Vienna (Holy Ghost Church in Vienna, 16, 1910-13) and Prague (Sacred Heart Church, 1928-32). After 1920 remained Plečnik in Ljubljana, in addition to his teaching at the university there, he determined the appearance of the city sustained by buildings and urban planning decisions and became the founder of modern Slovenian architecture, developing a formal style which became quite different by the one of his early mentors,  G. Semper and O.Wagner.

The Zacherhaus in Vienna

Zacherhaus – the building

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From an article on Orf magazine (http://wien.orf.at/magazin/studio/wienheute/stories/61317/):

Es war das erste "moderne" Haus in der Innenstadt – das so genannte Zacherlhaus. Den Reiz daran macht vor allem die Fassade mit den grauen, glänzenden Granitplatten und den steinernen Linien aus.
Beeindruckende Fassade.
Außergewöhnliches Stiegenhaus
Das Zacherlhaus wurde nach dem Bauherrn und damaligen Eigentümer Johann Zacherl benannt. Es zählt zu den bedeutendsten Bauten der Otto-Wagner-Schule. Im Erdgeschoss und Mezzanin ist es eines der ersten Eisenbetonbauwerke Wiens.
Geplant hat es Anfang des letzten Jahrhunderts der slowenische Architekt Josef Plecnik. Eine Besonderheit: die kleine, aber feine Eingangshalle. Insektenartige Leuchtkörper zieren das Stiegenhaus, in Anspielung auf den Mottenpulverfabrikanten und Eigentümer Johann Zacherl.

Heute ist das denkmalgeschützte Zacherlhaus ein Bürohaus. Türen und Fenster sind noch original. Fehlende Beschläge wurden sogar nachgegossen.
Im Auftrag der heutigen Eigentümers, den Nachfahren des Bauherrn Johann Zacherl, wird sehr sorgfältig mit dem Haus umgegangen. Man ist sich der Bedeutung des Hauses bewusst.

Zacherhaus – details

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Clean surface with metal bronze inserts, straight lines, symmetrical decorations, linear and non-rounded statues: these the very aesthetic elements which characterize the building. An aesthetic which influenced further development of the secession style trough the Austrian Hungarian Empire. Eventually, follow up to Plečnik innovative can be found in several buildings in Budapest, designed by architect who were mostly influenced by the European secessionist movement more than by the quest for a local folk oriented Hungarian way to the Art Nouveau.

Zacherhaus – Atlas decoration

Atlas figures in Teleki tér, 1, VIII district, Budapest

 

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Zacherhaus – Atlas decoration

Atlas figures, Vörösmarty tér 3. Kasselik-alapítvány üzlet- és bérháza(Korb Flóris és Giergl Kálmán) 1911.

 

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Zacherhaus  – vertical lines on the angled façade

Apartments house in Becsi ut, II District Budapest (Revesz and Kollar ?)

 

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Artist

Wiener Secession

Co-Worker

Year

14 November 1903 – 6 January 1904

Location/Map

Secession building, Vienna

Style

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Unabridged OCR version:

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VER SACRUM – Organ der Vereinigung Bildender Kunstler Osterreichs – 1898

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 Artist

Joseph Maria Olbrich (* 22.12.1867 – † 08.08.1908)

 Co-Worker

Gustav Klimt (Beethoven frieze)

 Year 

1897-1898

 Location/Map

 Style

The motto of the Secession, "Der Zeit ihre Kunst. Der Kunst ihre Freihei" constitutes a sort programmatic goal for the building itself.
Olbrich’s design was for a wing with a central entrance, surrounded by side rooms and a hall adjoining exhibition hall. The representative entry part combines the exterior walls of solid cubes as a structured entity, the center of a golden dome surrounded by four pylons. The pure white plaster facades have been geometrically arranged and adorned with a decoration in an entirely new, stylized shapes. Vegetable and geometric ornaments, such as the laurel trees growing up along the edges were cut directly in the plastering and completely flat on hold. The decoration also came to symbolic significance. Main motive was the laurel tree, the crown of the broken, of gilded leaves and berries, and the existing dome "Ver Sacrum" symbolizes the dawn of the new art . The smooth, white facades meant not a step to sobriety, but were an expression of purity and grandeur, "Walls … white and shiny, holy and chaste "(Olbrich). Forms, which give the effect of a "reliance on an archaic geometry" (Achleitner), the construction of a sacral taste. With the reduction to the basic form refers to the origin that is associated with a claim to renewal. The hall for exhibitions, however, was conceived to create an environment at the same time simple and functional, flexible, and covered by tent-like roofs of uniform glass skylight. It was designed for exhibitions of contemporary art and became a pioneering prototype. The so utterly new and strange-looking entrance, constructed of three interlocking cubes with a central, domed hall, however, followed a tradition, (approach inherited from his teacher Hasenauer Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna), which Olbrich in 1891 used his design for the Museum of Decorative Arts Opava had.

 Pictures

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 References


Article on Der Architekt (Volume 5, 1899)

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