Archive for the ‘Hungarian Secession Pictures’ Category

The 10th district of Budapest, also known under the name of Kőbánya, at the turn of the century was inhabited mainly by farmers. In fact there were some important factories and distilleries, amongst them, the family owned Dreher beer’s factory.

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Eventually, even the buildings in which the Dreher beer were produced, was an art nouveau styled one …

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READ the rest of the entry, with additional photos and maps !! 

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Around 8 pm last friday, just after having a swim training at Palatinus Strand. The very recently recontruction of the Torok bank palace with its mosaic and the Alpar Ignac yellow building in Deak tér, just mixed with the pale colors of the dusk, meanwhile my favourite trance music massage my ears and my brain … Budapest is an experience, every word is definitively over …

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I’ve to admit I’m very sorry for the lack of any update to this blog for more than two months. The month of may was very sad for me and, after that period, I’ve been very busy. And the reason of my occupation after the month of may was the fact that I was preparing to move in Budapest !And, yes, finally I’m right there, I now live in this dream capital city, the very capital city of the secession. As a consequence, you have to expect an improvement in the quality of the photos and of the reportages as well.

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The very first post of my Budapest period is dedicated to the street that, after Rakoczi utca, becomes Thököly utca just after the Keleti palyaudvar (rail station). Picture I took and I now publish her, are taken from this very interesting street and its neighbors. It is my first “Secessionist’s Promenade”and I hope you enjoy the gallery and this new section. Expect more !

Rich in colourful traditions, Terézváros is the heart of Budapest. In the last 225 years, our district has written its name in the history of the country and the capital.

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Really, who knows the history of art I think cannot notice the close relationship between the János Vaszary painting entitled “Nude girl with red hair” (1899) and the Ernst Kirchner famous “Marcella” (1909).

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It seems that the girl represented was the same, just viewed by different perspectives. And, in this case, the model who posed for Kirchner shouldn’t be the same in front of Vaszary, even because she would be at least ten years older …

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A wonderful frieze just up on the entrance of the Lybian embassy in Stefánia út 111.

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All those fascinating red hair girlies are really so luscious and very very erotic …

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A tribute to Budapest just few days before Christmas !

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Full gallery follows !

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Situated just outside the inner cit, on Pest side, including the famous (even by turistic point of view) Margareth Island, the XIII district present very interesting secessionist buildings, in particular in the zones around the Nyugati rail station.

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First of all a service information: we are now reachable also using our hungarian domain, at the address http://www.secession.hu ! You haven’t more excuse not to keep in mind the not-so-english-compliant spelling of the hungarian word “szecesszio”. Just remember “secession” (very understandable in german and in english language) and paste the hungarian suffix “.hu”. that’s all folks !

John Lukacs’s “Budapest 1900: A Historical Portrait of a City and Its Culture” is perhaps one of the most read book concerning the social history of Budapest at the turn of the century. Lukacs, an american historian, obviously hungarian by origin, knows to catch the reader attention using an essayst style that’s close to novelist’s:

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“Lukacs’s book is a lyrical, sometimes dazzling, never merely nostalgic evocation of a glorious period in the city’s history. . . . {His} true sympathy lies . . . not with the famous expatriates, but with the writers and intellectuals who lived and died at home: the poets Endre Ady and Mihaly Babits; the novelists Ferenc Herczeg, Sandor Hunyady, Frigyes Karinthy, Dezso Kosztolanyi, Gyula Krudy, Kalman Mikszath, and Zsigmond Moricz; the political essayist DezsoSzabo; the playwright Erno Szep; the literary historian Antal Szerb; and others. . . . {John Lukacs} sets out to explain Hungarian literature to English-speaking readers. Though I have no idea whether or not he will succeed, few interpreters of Hungarian literature have made a more touching and eloquent attempt.” — The New York Review of Books

However, when I first read the book, I wasn’t impressed only by the content of the book tiself. In my opinion, what’s also cathing eye on that book was the photo on the cover. It represents the terrace of a well known coffe-house at the turn of the century, in Andrassy utca, just in front of the Opera, in the VIth district. Nowaday the coffe-shop doesn’t exist no more and the building itself is on reconstruction. I tried to take a picture exactly in the same position of the original 1900′s photo.

The Lukacs essay’s cover picture on the very left, while on the right is the same view at the present date:

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People simply disappear with an effect not so far by those used in tv-series such as C.S.I., isn’t ?

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