Archive for the ‘Separated at birth’ Category

Really, who knows the history of art I think cannot notice the close relationship between the János Vaszary painting entitled “Nude girl with red hair” (1899) and the Ernst Kirchner famous “Marcella” (1909).

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It seems that the girl represented was the same, just viewed by different perspectives. And, in this case, the model who posed for Kirchner shouldn’t be the same in front of Vaszary, even because she would be at least ten years older …

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Ferenc Helbing was professor of graphics at the Applied Art High School of Budapest and was famous because he worked for the Polygraph where he designed several pengo and krone banknotes.

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Lotz was one of the greatest Hungarian academic painters in the style of Historicism. He started his studies at the Viennese private school of Karl Rahl in 1852; later he worked for Rahl by drawing his preliminary cartoons. Between 1855 and 1870 Lotz painted his panneaux in a characteristically romantic style. The female portraits and nudes painted between 1855 and 1879 show the stylistic traits of lyrical realism and fine naturalism.Lotz was one of the most popular mural painters of this time. His murals were always in harmony with the style of the building they were designed for. The frieze compositions decorating the staircases of the Hungarian National Museum and the frescos in the Budapest Vigadó (Casino) – both done jointly with Mór Than -, the ceiling of the Opera’s auditorium, and the murals in the House of Parliament are among his best-known works. – http://hungart.euroweb.hu/english/l/lotz/

The paintings entitled “The Bathing Woman” was one of the well known works by Lotz.

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First of all a service information: we are now reachable also using our hungarian domain, at the address http://www.secession.hu ! You haven’t more excuse not to keep in mind the not-so-english-compliant spelling of the hungarian word “szecesszio”. Just remember “secession” (very understandable in german and in english language) and paste the hungarian suffix “.hu”. that’s all folks !

John Lukacs’s “Budapest 1900: A Historical Portrait of a City and Its Culture” is perhaps one of the most read book concerning the social history of Budapest at the turn of the century. Lukacs, an american historian, obviously hungarian by origin, knows to catch the reader attention using an essayst style that’s close to novelist’s:

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“Lukacs’s book is a lyrical, sometimes dazzling, never merely nostalgic evocation of a glorious period in the city’s history. . . . {His} true sympathy lies . . . not with the famous expatriates, but with the writers and intellectuals who lived and died at home: the poets Endre Ady and Mihaly Babits; the novelists Ferenc Herczeg, Sandor Hunyady, Frigyes Karinthy, Dezso Kosztolanyi, Gyula Krudy, Kalman Mikszath, and Zsigmond Moricz; the political essayist DezsoSzabo; the playwright Erno Szep; the literary historian Antal Szerb; and others. . . . {John Lukacs} sets out to explain Hungarian literature to English-speaking readers. Though I have no idea whether or not he will succeed, few interpreters of Hungarian literature have made a more touching and eloquent attempt.” — The New York Review of Books

However, when I first read the book, I wasn’t impressed only by the content of the book tiself. In my opinion, what’s also cathing eye on that book was the photo on the cover. It represents the terrace of a well known coffe-house at the turn of the century, in Andrassy utca, just in front of the Opera, in the VIth district. Nowaday the coffe-shop doesn’t exist no more and the building itself is on reconstruction. I tried to take a picture exactly in the same position of the original 1900′s photo.

The Lukacs essay’s cover picture on the very left, while on the right is the same view at the present date:

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People simply disappear with an effect not so far by those used in tv-series such as C.S.I., isn’t ?

Aladár Körösfői-Kriesch was one of the most influent artist of the so called Gödöllő artistic community. its painting (but also its textile works and illustrations) are mostly influenced by the english developements of style at the turn of the century. In particular, the decorative use of lines (mainly for the influence of Walter Crane) and a symbolic taste are widely used at the Gödöllő brotherhood.

IT would be interesting to notice the close similarities between some of the Aladár Körösfői-Kriesch works and art nouveau artistic productions coming directly from the United Kingdom. I found some closeness, in particular, between a pen drawing by the english artist Gertrude Bradley (eventually entitled The Cherry Festival) and a very famous painting by Körösfői-Kriesch, now at the Hungarian National Gallery, named “The cicle of Klara”.

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On the left, the painting of the hungarian artist, on the right the engish illustrator’ work. Of course, here the similarities don’t reside on the subject itself, on the contrary is the style that, in my opinion, is similar. In particular, the main focus, in both the scenes, is placed on the very right. Moreover, in both the representations the main character is a soldier: and both the soldiers are so similar that, er, they really seem brother, at least. Look at the two details:

 

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The influences of the english Art Nouveau upon hungarian Szecesszio are not to be limited to the main role played by Walter Crane: the english Art Nouveau mainstream, and mainly the influences by the so called Arts and Craft movement, constitued one of the main source of ispirations for a large part of the hungarian turn-of-the-century artistic movements.

Main role of the line, floral decorations, symbolism of naturalistic elements and of the feminine characters, are elements that worth to be investigated when regarding at the relationship between the two movements.

Really this post is not at all about the most famous sculpture of the hungarian artist Miklos Ligeti, the Anonymus statue at Varosligeti park. This is only the very first post of a new category I decided to name “Separated at birth”.

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The famous Anonymus statue at Varosligeti park in Budapest

In those articles I’d like to show the similarities, either by artistic, subject or technical point of view, between two or more masterpieces, at least one of them hungarian by origin. In this article I’d like to let you notice the similarities, somewhat surprising, between a sculpture by Ligeti Miklos stored in the Hungarian National Museum, and another sculpture, by anonymous artist, I saw last saturday at the Art Verona fair.

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On the left side you can see the original Ligeti masterpiece; on the other side the anonymous  one. Below the Ligeti’s sculpture by another perspective:

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 Ok, ok, maybe not so exciting as a comparison: You could expect something more, but this was only to introduce this category ;)

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