Artist

 

 Co-Worker

 

 Year 

 

 Location/Map

 Style

 

 Pictures

Ernest Blerot, circa 1900, Apartments houses, Rue Saint Boniface

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Gustav Strauven, House, rue Souveraine, 52 – 1902

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Octave van Rysselberghe, Hotel Otlet, rue de Livourne – 1912

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Paul Hankar, Hotel Ciamberlani, rue Defacqz 48 – 1897

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Armand van Waesberghe, House, rue Fader 85 – 1900

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Albert Roosenboom, Hause, rue Fader 85 – 1900

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Victor Horta, Hotel Tassel,rue Paul Emile Janson, 13-15 – 1893-1894

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Victor Horta, Hotel Tassel, rue Paul Emile Janson – 1893-1894

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Hotel Solvay, 224 Avenue Louise, Brussels, also dates from these years, started in 1895, finished 1900, and it is interesting to note that these houses with all their ornaments were ready on Horta’s drawing board in 1895 even before Sigfried Bing opened his shop in Paris. Horta continued throughout the 1890′s in his dual task, the creation of a new idiom of form and the search for a logical and clearly expressed architectural solution to constructional problems. The first task had been achieved in Tassel’s house, 1892-93, the second found a completely satisfactory solution in the Maison du Peuple, 1896-99, Place Emile van de Velde, Brussels, the first facade in Belgium consisting mainly of iron and glass. It is of importance to the history of architecture owing to its construction, but from the point of view of Art Nouveau it is mainly interesting because of its grilles. – Tchudi Madsen

Architect George Hobé, sgraffitos by Paul Cauchie, House, rue de Chatelain 63 – 1904

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Ernest Blerot, House, rue Washington, 50 – 1898

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Victor Horta, Hause Vinck, rue Washington 85 – 1903

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Adrien Blomme, Hause, rue Americaine 205 – 1905

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Adrien Blomme, Hause, rue Americaine 205 – 1905

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Octave van Rysselberghe and Henrsy van de Velde, rue Jordaens 34 – 1896

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Ernest Blerot, rue de la Valle – 1901-1903

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Victor Horta, avenue Louise 224 – 1895-1898

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Ernest Blerot, rue Vilain XIIII 7 – 1902

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Frans Tilley, rue TVilain XIIII 7 – 1902

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 References

 

 Artist

Architect: Emil Vidor

 Co-Worker

 

 Year 

1903

 Location/Map

 Style

 

 Pictures

Façade – Architect Emil Vidor

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A great example of belgian style lines and asymmetric façade. One of the rare examples of this style in Budapest

Furniture and objects at –1 floor

Budapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession Museum

 

Furniture and objects at ground floor

Budapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumDSCF2293DSCF2297

 

Furniture and objects at first floor

Budapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession MuseumBudapest - Szecesszio Secession Museum

 

 References

 

 Artist

Ugo Giusti, architect

 Co-Worker

Galileo Chini, main decorator

 Year 

 

 Location/Map

 Style

The Berzieri, erected in Salsomaggiore in 1913-1923, is one of the most representative buildings of Art Nouveau in Italy. Design due to architect Ugo Giusti and decorator Galileo Chini and was inspired by the geometric abstractions typical of the Viennese Secession.
The floral and curves ornaments, the general sense of lightweight beauty
and sinuous lines achieve an ideal accord with the ephemeral environment of the spa baths.
Galileo Chini, almost self-taught but with a large capacity, Florence, was born in 1873 in Firenze.
Educated as ceramist, he approached to the Liberty style and that of the Viennese Secession. 
His works were exhibited at international exhibitions in London (1898), Paris (1900), Turin (1902). In 1909 he prepared cartoons for the dome of the headquarters of the Venice Biennale.
In 1911 he moved to Persia, the Shah called for the decoration of the palace’s throne by architect Rigotti.
That same year he went to Bangkok to decorate the Palace of the King of Siam. Back in Italy teached at the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence.
Some of his work can be found at the Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Rome, the Uffizi in Florence, the Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Palazzo Pitti and the Museum of Ceramics in Faenza.

 Pictures

Terme Berzieri, architect Ugo Giusti – façade

Terme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme Berzieri

 

 

Terme Berzieri, architect Ugo Giusti – façade details

Terme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme Berzieri

 

Galileo Chini – Ground Floor decorations

Terme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme Berzieri

 

Galileo Chini – First Floor decorations

Terme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme Berzieri

 

Terme Berzieri – Details

Terme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme BerzieriTerme Berzieri

 

 References

 

 Artist

Sámuel Révész nèe Rosenfeld and József Kollár

 Co-Worker

 

 Year 

Sámuel  Révész (Rosenfeld) (Budapest, 1877 – Budapest, 1928. XI) and József Kollár (Pest. 1869 – Budapest, 1943. VI)

 Location/Map

 Style

At the turn of the century, the work of Revesz and Kollar represents a further development in the szecesszio style. Their style, in the context of Hungarian Art Nouveau, differ from the Lechner’s works, which tend to a definition of a national Hungarian way to art nouveau inheriting Hungarian folk art elements, and from the stylistic researches of Karoly Kos, Kozma Lajos, Bela Lajta and the Young Architects towards the modernist development of the Hungarian and Transilvanian country side architecture. The style of Revesz and Kollar is heavily influenced by Western Europe, in particular by the German Jugendstil.
The vertical development recalls some German architecture in Darmstadt as well as similar vertical development in Riga. The Neo-gothic stylistic elements, such as façade reliefs, symbolic images, scenes and characters on the façade, angled mascaroons, and carved flutes.
A very particular house also reports a sgraffito (definitively unusual in Budapest Art Nouveau scene) on its façade.
On the contrary of some Hungarian art tendencies (like Godollo school or some primitivism of folk art of the group of the Young Architects or Karoly Kos) tRevesz and Kollar made use of several technological improvements, like iron and glass window façades.
The artistic production of the two architects represent a completely different approach of the turn of the century art and aesthetic in Hungary. Loking better to the international developments rather than to the pure folk art and forms, Revesz and Kollar were within the ones who introduced modernist tendencies in Hungary, a style not influenced by Tolstoyan philosophy, rather with a strong cosmopolitan taste.

 Pictures

Budapest IX., Szamuely utca 30-32. Központi zálogház. architected in 1900, built 1901-1903

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Budapest VIII., Népszínház u. 7. Lakóház 1912

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Budapest VIII., Népszínház u. 7. Lakóház 1912

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Neo-gothic style with vertical lines strengthen with relief and carved marble. Symbolic images, scenes and characters on the façade, angled mascaroons, and carved flutes are all neo-gothic elements with a Jugendstil taste. The development of the building and the architectural lines move up to vertical lines.

 

Budapest VI., Zichy Jenő utca 10. dr. Weisz-ház 1903

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

 One of the most interesting Art Nouveau Building in Budapest. The façade is surmounted by two sgraffitos, a technique which was quite unusual in the Hungarian capital city at the turn of the century. Actually this one represents the sole sgraffito conceived and realized with a technique very close to the one widely adopted in Bruxelles (see: Bruxelles Sgraffites on artnouveau.at). Mascaroons differ from other Revesz and Kollar’s buildings. The building style is quite evidently influenced by the western Europe Art Nouveau. Any references to local Hungarian szecesszio is avoided, and the building lacks typical stylistic elements which constitutes the decoration basis of the Hungarian szecesszio.

Budapest V., Deák Ferenc utca 17. Lakó- és üzletház 1910 körül

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszDSCF5062DSCF5061

Modernist tendencies and use of new materials (such like iron and curved glass surfaces) for one of the most interesting and technologically advanced production of Hungarian Art Nouveau.

Budapest V., Váci utca 11 /B. Láhne-üzlet-és lakóház 1912

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

 Gothic style combined with Secessionist one; geometric shapes and lines paired with terrific masks and strange characters; clean design combined with numerous symbolic decorative elements. Contradiction and syncretism were used by Sámuel Révész and Jószef Kollár to reinforce the multitude of interpretations of the symbols behind their works. The resulting effect is terrific: an enjoyment for the sight, an exciting challenge for the interpretative capabilities of the intellect, a final checkmate for the unifying efforts of the reason.

Budapest V Deák Ferenc u. 23. Modern-és Breitner Áruház és lakóház

DSCF5053DSCF5054Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszDSCF5057Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszDSCF5055

 

Budapest VI., Varosliget fasor 40. Révész-villa, saját házuk és műtermük 1911

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

 

Budapest VI., Lovag utca 20. Lakóház MP 1906/7

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

 

Budapest XIII.. Hegedűs Gyula utca 20. Lakóház 1909

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

 

Budapest XIII.. Hegedús Gyula utca 20. Lakóház 1909

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Budapest XIII.. Hegedús Gyula utca 8. Lakóház 1909

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

 

Budapest V., Március 15. tér 7. Lakóház 1914. Toldalékként épült a Mátyás Pince épületének eredeti, 1903-ban készüli, Schütz Rezső által tervezett részéhez.]

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Apartments house, Budapest VII, Akacfa utca 20

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Budapest V Báthory u. 7 Lakóház

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Schmahl neogótikus stílusában épült lakóház (Budapest VIII., Rákóczi út 7.).

Jozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel ReveszJozsef Kollar and  Samuel Revesz

Pure neo-gothic style with massive use of Gothic, trefoil and ogee arches.

Budapest XIII.. Hegedús Gyula utca 22-24. Lakóház 1909 (attribuited by Mattia Moretti)

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The decorative style (including squared face mascaroons and grotesque mascaroons just in relief over the façade, together with symbolic female figures) and sructural elements (vertical development, carved  and ondulated surface on the façade, thus providing a sort of neo-gothic taste) are evidences of the Revesz and Kollar art. The buildings themselves are also close to other (the one at number 20) by the same authors. I would then attributed these two apartments houses to Revesz and Kollar, while still seeking for the definitive evidence.

 References

 Sámuel Révész és Jószef Kollár: flying right up to the sky on artnouveau.at

 Artist

Paul Saintenoy

 Co-Worker

 

 Year 

1898-1899

 Location/Map

 Style

Iron structure with large windows and glass inserts. Perpendicular Art Nouveau style with use of extreme iron techniques.

 Pictures

 DSCF8441DSCF8440DSCF8442DSCF8443DSCF8444DSCF8445DSCF7982DSCF7720DSCF7725DSCF7724DSCF7723DSCF7722DSCF7721

 References

 

 Artist

Sandor Abt

 Co-Worker

Zsolnay factories

 Year 

Evidence of the drawing back in 1900, Presented in World Exposition in Turin, 1902

 Location/Map

 

 Style

Ceramic worked with Eozin technique by Zsolnay Factories, Pecs.

 Pictures


Luna, by Sandor Abt, as seen in Budapest Art Fair, 2009 (probably original)

DSCF9108DSCF9109DSCF9110DSCF9111DSCF9112DSCF9113DSCF9114DSCF9115DSCF9116

 References

Luna, by Sandor Abt, in Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration, volume 11 (reportage on Hungarian Kunstgewerbe in Turin 1902)

deutschekunstund11kochuoft_0123

Luna, by Sandor Abt, in Iparmuveszet, volume 5 1900

1900_05_208

 

Luna, by Sandor Abt, remanufactured by Zsolnay industries, around 1920 (?)

DSCF8866 

Decoration on the façade of the Budapest “Ferenc Liszt” music Academy, frieze by Geza Maroti, 1907

DSCF0812

Ferenc Helbing “Alom” (“the Dream”), 1902

Helbing-Alom

 Artist

Aladar Korosfoi Kriesch

 Co-Worker

 

 Year 

1907

 Location/Map

 Style

Quote from “Bartók and his world”, author Péter Laki

The most significant sign of the nationalist folk renewal during Bartók’s student years in Budapest was the creation of an artists’ colony, which included craftspeople, designers, and architects, in 190a at Gödöllő, a small town 30 kilometers northwest of Budapest. Its aesthetic philosophy was based on the later writings of Leo Tolstoy and on the ideas of William Morris and John Ruskin. Bartók’s awareness of the Gödöllő experiment can be inferred from the influence exerted by the colony’s celebration of Tolstoyan virtues. The display of allegiance to a credo of anticapitalist, antimodern spiritual simplicity among the Gödöllő circle, particularly in the case of the main ideolo¬gist of the Gödöllő group, the painter Aladár Körösfói Kriesch (1863-1920), was later emulated byBartók.

In 1907 Bartók exchanged the traditional nineteenth century-style Hungarian national outfit to which he had become attached (which he wore at his final recital at the Conservatory, despite the strenuous objections of his teacher, Thomán, who was understandably uncomfortable with its chauvinist and implicitly anti-Semitic symbolism) to a distinctly Tolstoyan outfit, characteristic of Gödöllő. Beyond the search for a simpler rural life as an alternative to the corruptions of urban industrialization and an allegiance to preindustrial artisan modes of production, the Gödöllő group was commit¬ted to documenting and emulating a "true" Hungarian folk art that predated 1848. This group of artists participated in a major study of rural peasant folk art. which ran parallel to Bartök’s and Kodály s re¬searches. A five-volume study was published, of which two focused on Transylvania. Bartók’s affinity for Hungarian folk furniture mirrored a fashion among Budapest intellectuals and artists dating from before 1905- The notion that the rediscovery of a vital rural folk tradition could function as a critical opposition to established Hungarian national ideology emerged in the visual arts before Bartók and Kodály began their work. Even the crafts done at the Zsolnay factory at the turn of the century, which Bartók certainly saw, reflect the ideal of a fusion between the folk Hungarian and the modern.8′- Members of the Gödöllő circle and the Nagybánya group, particularly the painters Sándor Nagy (1869-1950) and István Csók (1865-1961), shared the conviction thai in the synthesis between the rediscovery of a Hun¬garian rural folk tradition and Western aesthetic modernism a distinctly modern Hungarian art and culture would develop.

Gödöllő leading figure, Kriesch, was commissioned to paint the main mural for the new home of the Budapest Conservatory. The 1907 building, designed by Kálmán Gicrgl and Flóris Korb, showed the influence of Lechner. The building was begun in 1903, the year of Bartók s Kossuth. Unlike Lechner’s work, the frame of the building was more directly evocative of Western European historicism. Nevertheless. Jugendstil elements were evident in the exterior, particularly in the design of the facade, around the windows, and the entrance. The exterior statuary of the Conservatory was done by Géza Maróti (1875-1941), Hungary’s leading Jugendstil sculptor and architect, whose designs for the Milan Exposition of 1906celebrated folk, rural, and native Hungarian motifs.

The interior of the new Conservatory building was more radical. The decoration, particularly along the staircase, evoked the styles of distinctly Hungarian crafts. Kriesch s mural presented a symbolist al¬egory in which the embodiment of innocence, simplicity, devotion, and nature becomes a metaphor for the true source of art. The aspiration to a state of premodern purity evident in Kricsch’s renderings mirrored the anti-urban and anti-cosmopolitan direction of Hun¬garian aesthetic visual modernism during the first decade of the twen¬tieth century. Kriesch wrote, "We cannot bring art worthy of the name into modern life until we consciously restore the social conditions . . . in their more primitive and unconscious manifestations."*’ Few state¬ments were as reminiscent of and congruent with Bartok*s own rheto¬ric alKnit folk music than Kriesch s 1908 view concerning folk art: "The art of the Hungarian people, like all true art, is a fully organic »art of the life of the people

.

 Pictures

 Aladar Korosfoi KrieschAladar Korosfoi KrieschAladar Korosfoi Kriesch

 References

 

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